How rich is George Coleman? Net Worth, Money

actors
January 1, 2020

George Coleman Net Worth

How Much money George S. Coleman has? For this question we spent 28 hours on research (Wikipedia, Youtube, we read books in libraries, etc) to review the post.

The main source of income: Actors
Total Net Worth at the moment 2021 year – is about $95,6 Million.

Youtube

Biography

George S. Coleman information Birth date: March 8, 1935 Birth place: Memphis, Tennessee, United States Profession:Actor, Music Department Spouse:Carol Hollister (m. ?–2009) Children:Gloria Coleman, George Coleman, Jr Movies:Field Of Honor

Height, Weight

:How tall is George Coleman – 1,73m.
How much weight is George Coleman – 57kg

Photos

George Coleman Net Worth
George Coleman Net Worth
George Coleman Net Worth
George Coleman Net Worth

Wiki

George S. Coleman was born in Memphis, TN. Coleman taught himself to play the alto saxophone in his teens, inspired (like many jazz musicians of his generation) by Charlie Parker. Among his schoolmates were Harold Mabern, Booker Little, Frank Strozier, Hank Crawford and Charles Lloyd.[1] After working with Ray Charles, Coleman started working with…
Biography,Coleman was born in Memphis, Tennessee. He was taught how to play the alto saxophone in his teens by his older brother Lucian Adams, inspired (like many jazz musicians of his generation) by Charlie Parker. Among his schoolmates were Harold Mabern, Booker Little, Frank Strozier, Hank Crawford, and Charles Lloyd. After working with Ray Charles, Coleman started working with B.B. King in 1953, at which point he switched to tenor saxophone. In 1956 Coleman moved to Chicago, along with Booker Little, where he worked with Gene Ammons and Johnny Griffin before joining Max Roachs quintet 1958–1959. Coleman recorded with organist Jimmy Smiths Houseparty (1957), with Lee Morgan, Curtis Fuller, Kenny Burrell, and Donald Bailey. Moving to New York City with Max Roach in that year, he went on to play with Slide Hampton (1959–1962), Ron Carter, Jimmy Cobb, and Wild Bill Davis (1962), before joining Miles Daviss quintet in 1963–1964.His albums with Davis (and the rhythm section of Herbie Hancock (piano), Ron Carter (bass), and Tony Williams (drums)) are Seven Steps to Heaven (1963), A Rare Home Town Appearance (1963), Cote Blues (1963), In Europe (1963), My Funny Valentine (1964) and Four & More, both live recordings of a concert in Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City in February 1964. Shortly after this concert, Coleman was replaced by Wayne Shorter. Nevertheless, Davis retained a high opinion of Colemans playing, stating that George played everything almost perfectly…He was a hell of a musician. Coleman played with Lionel Hampton (1965–1966), also in 1965 and on Chet Bakers The Prestige Sessions, with Kirk Lightsey, Herman Wright, and Roy Brooks. Charles Mingus (1977–1978), Shirley Scott (1972), Clark Terry, Horace Silver, Elvin Jones (1968), Cedar Walton (1975), Ahmad Jamal (1994, 2000), and many others.Coleman also appeared in the film Freejack (1992), the science-fiction film with Emilio Estevez, Mick Jagger, and Anthony Hopkins, and 1996s The Preachers Wife with Denzel Washington and Whitney Houston.Coleman recorded into the 2000s. His CD as co-leader, Four Generations of Miles: A Live Tribute to Miles, with bassist Ron Carter, drummer Jimmy Cobb and guitarist Mike Stern was released on Chesky Records in October 2002 and it concentrates almost exclusively on the 1950s repertoire of Miles Davis. Tracks include: There Is No Greater Love, All Blues, On Green Dolphin Street, Blue in Green, 81, Freddie Freeloader, My Funny Valentine, If I Were a Bell, and Oleo. He was featured on Joey DeFrancescos 2006 release Organic Vibes, along with vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson, Billboards Top Jazz Album, peaked to No. 17.Coleman was married to jazz organist Gloria Coleman and is father to jazz drummer George Coleman Jr.He was been named to the Memphis Music Hall of Fame in 2015 and received a brass note on the Beale Street Brass Notes Walk of Fame.

Summary

Wikipedia Source: George Coleman

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