Henry Jennings Net Worth, Age, Height, Weight

actors
March 10, 2018

Henry Jennings Net Worth

Henry Jennings makes how much a year? For this question we spent 26 hours on research (Wikipedia, Youtube, we read books in libraries, etc) to review the post.

The main source of income: Actors
Total Net Worth at the moment 2018 year – is about $4,4 Million.

Youtube

Biography

Henry Jennings informationDeath date: 1745-01-01 Profession:Actor

Height, Weight

:How tall is Henry Jennings – 1,74m.
How much weight is Henry Jennings – 58kg

Pictures

Henry Jennings Net Worth
Henry Jennings Net Worth
Henry Jennings Net Worth
Henry Jennings Net Worth

Wiki

Henry Jennings (died 1745) was an 18th-century British privateer who served primarily during the War of Spanish Succession and later served as leader of the pirate haven of New Providence.Although little is known of Jennings early life, he was first recorded as a privateer during the War of the Spanish Succession operating from Jamaica, then governed by Lord Archibald Hamilton. There is evidence that Jennings owned enough land in Jamaica to live comfortably, thus leaving his motivations for piracy to conjecture.His first recorded act of piracy took place in early 1716 when, with three vessels and 150-300 men, Jennings fleet ambushed the Spanish salvage camp from the 1715 Treasure Fleet. After forcing the retreat of around 60 soldiers, Jennings set sail for Jamaica carrying back an estimated 350,000 pesos.While en route to Jamaica, Jennings encountered another Spanish ship and captured another 60,000 pesos.When Jennings encountered Black Sam Bellamy, he teamed with him to commit more piracies against the French. When Bellamy double-crossed him, Jennings ruthlessness was evidenced in the brutal slaying of more than 20 Frenchmen and Englishmen, and the burning of an innocent Englishmans merchant sloop.Jennings was declared a pirate by the very governor who had commissioned him & originally condoned his actions (taking a cut for himself). Jennings was forced to flee from Jamaica and eventually established a new base of operations in New Providence in the Bahamas. Based out of Nassau for a time, Jennings became an unofficial mayor of the growing pirate colony and retires from piracy.In early 1718, Jennings surrendered to authorities following the general amnesty declared by the newly appointed Governor of the Bahamas, Woodes Rogers. He retired as a wealthy plantation owner in Bermuda, where he received his pardon.He is one of very few pirates said to have enjoyed a successful retirement. It is unknown what his ultimate fate was, though some historians speculate that he was captured by the Spanish in his later years, dying in ambiguity in a New Spain prison. Other legends have him growing old with his family in Bermuda.
Biography,Privateering from JamaicaAuthor Colin Woodard describes Jennings as “an educated ship captain with a comfortable estate” on Bermuda, and he had estates on both Bermuda and Jamaica. Although little is known of Jennings early life, he was first recorded as a privateer during the War of the Spanish Succession[citation needed] operating from Jamaica, then governed by Lord Archibald Hamilton. There is evidence that Jennings owned enough land in Jamaica to live comfortably, thus leaving his motivations for piracy to conjecture.[citation needed]Plate Fleet raids of November 1715On July 31, 1715, all 11 vessels of the 1715 Treasure Fleet, a large Spanish treasure fleet heading out from Havana, wrecked in a hurricane along the coasts of Florida near Cape Canaveral. News of the wreck and their distress call reached Jamaica in November 1715, and Jennings and his ship Bersheba sailed immediately to the Florida coast. Jennings and the Bersheba had been granted a commission by the governor of Jamaica, Lord Archibald Hamilton, as had the Eagle. They had been sanctioned to Execute all manner of Acts of Hostility against pyrates according to the Law of Arms, with explicit instructions not to attack anyone except pirates. History Today states that it was later claimed that Hamilton had invested in the ships and endorsed a plan for them to attack the Spanish wrecks as well. Hamilton would later deny involvement in the upcoming attacks on Spanish fleets.In December Jennings and Charles Vane captured a Spanish mail ship and got the exact position of the main Spanish salvage camp and Urca de Lima from her captain Pedro de la Vega.Jennings first recorded act of piracy took place in early 1716 when, with three vessels and 150-300 men, Jennings fleet ambushed the Spanish salvage camp from the 1715 Treasure Fleet. While other pirates raided the treasure, Jennings raided the storehouses in Florida where the Spanish salvers were keeping recovered treasure. The nucleus of the pirate force was a group of English ex-privateers: Jennings, Charles Vane, Samuel Bellamy of Whydah Gally fame, Benjamin Hornigold, and Edward England.[citation needed] Although most of the treasure had already been returned to Havana after collection by Indian divers, Jennings found the rest awaiting shipment on the beach in a lightly guarded fort at Palma de Ayz, possibly close to Vero Beach. Jennings overtook the 60 or so guards with 300 privateers, and forced the retreat of around 60 soldiers.and pirates such as Edward England took part in Jennings assault on the salvage camp, stealing ?87,000 in gold and silver. Charles Vane was on Jennings ship during the raid as well, and began serving under Jennings in 1716.[citation needed]The pirates made off with about ?87,500 of gold and silver.After the raid, Jennings set sail for Jamaica carrying back an estimated 350,000 peso, accompanied by fellow Captain John Wills and his crew of the Eagle. Jennings gained approximately 120,000 pieces of eight and brought the treasure back to Jamaica. While en route to Jamaica, Jennings encountered another Spanish ship and captured another 60,000 pesos.[citation needed]After the Florida raid, Jennings and his crew linked up with Ben Hornigolds three sets of pirates from New Providence Island.French ship raids of April 1716History Today related that Jennings and Wills arrival with their illicitly acquired fortune created a sensation in Jamaica, with many other privateers and pirates sailing to Florida to seek treasure from the wrecks along what would become known as the Treasure Coast. Although Hamilton stated he did not take any prize money from the November 1715 raid, he did afterwards sign another commission and departure paper for Jennings. Jennings in April 1716 set out from Bluefield’s Bay in Jamaica in his sloop Bersheba. His intention was to fish the Spanish wrecks, moving up from the Isle of Pines to Florida. In April 1716, he captured the French vessel Marianne. During the attack, he fired the Bershebas Great Gun himself, easily taking the ship. At this time he encountered Benjamin Hornigold in the Benjamin attempting to join in the plunder of the Marianne. Jennings “harshly” rebuffed Hornigold for interfering in his “official” operation, Hornigold and other ships involved in the raid afterwards attacked other French ships instead.After the raid on the Marianne, Jennings and two other captains set sail for New Providence, an island in the Bahamas and former capital of the collapsed Bahamian government. On the way to New Providence, Jennings chased down Hornigold to secure the treasure from the Mary, a ship Hornigold had just captured. Reaching New Providence about April 22, 1716, Jennings used the island as a base to split the French spoils According to Jennings’ quartermaster, there was some dispute on how the spoils were distributed among the men. According to a deposition based on an eyewitness: ’’About 22nd April last, Capt. Jennings arrived at Providence and bought in as prize a French ship [Marianne] mounted with 32 guns which he had taken at the Bay of Hounds [Bahia Honda], and there shared the cargo (which was very rich consisting of European goods for the Spanish trade) amongst his men, and then went in the said ship to the wrecks were he served as Commodore and guardship.” After some of the men began to take spoils on their initiative, Jennings split the French spoils three ways: one third for the men, and one third each for sloop owners Daniel Axtell and Jasper Ashworth. After the French raids, Jennings continued to sail for the wrecks in Florida, stopping ships such as Spanish mailboats along the way.Expulsion from JamaicaWhen Jennings sailed with the Bersheba to the wrecks a third time, he was under direct orders of Daniel De Costa Alvarenga, a Jewish merchant from Kingston who was the new owner of the sloop. Hamilton tried to stop the Bersheba from sailing on this trip, but was ignored as it had official clearance. After political pressure, Hamilton issued proclamations in April 1716 forbidding all commissioned vessels in Jamaica from fishing the Florida wrecks for plunder. It was one of his last acts as governor before Hamilton was himself arrested, and overall he declared all passes issued to treasure hunters null and void, meaning that henceforth, any captain attacking Spanish forts or vessels in peacetime was a pirate. On his third trip to the wrecks, Jennings intercepted a Spanish vessel as it returned from the salvage site, and reappeared off Port Royal with 30,000 pieces of eight he’d forcibly taken from the Spanish vessel. Hamilton made it clear that Jennings would be arrested if the ‘’Bersheba’’ entered Kingston harbor, and the sloop and the cargo impounded. Jennings and his crew chose to sail away with their cargo.Republic in the BahamasDeclared a pirate by Lord Archibald Hamilton,[citation needed] he couldnt return to Jamaica according to Channel24, and so he established Nassau as his base for further raids on Spanish wrecks.[11] Evicted from the mainland of Jamaica, many pirates followed Jennings’ example and headed for New Providence. By the end of 1715, Jennings arrived in Nassau with ?87,000 in recovered Spanish treasure, as the city was experiencing an expansion.[clarification needed] Details of Jennings life from this time have been reconstructed from the depositions of Peter Heywood, who became the new acting governor of Jamaica as Hamilton was removed from the position in late 1716.The New Providence capital of Nassau by 1715 was the former capital of the collapsed Bahamian government. Nassaus pirate population grew from dozens to hundreds after the Florida shipwreck raids, and by early 1716, the Governor of Bermuda stated that there were over 1000 pirates in Nassau and that they outnumbered the mere hundred of inhabitants in the town.[12] Pirate Benjamin Hornigold proposed that he would lead the pirates of the Nassau Pirate Republic in the start of 1716. They chose the moniker “Flying Gang.” The Republic of Pirates was dominated by two famous pirates who were bitter rivals – Hornigold and Jennings. Hornigold was mentor to pirates such as the infamous Edward Teach, known as Blackbeard, along with Sam Bellamy and Stede Bonnet. Jennings was mentor to Charles Vane, Calico Jack Rackham, Anne Bonny, and Mary Read. Despite their rivalries, the pirates formed themselves into the Flying Gang and quickly became infamous for their exploits.[12] By the summer of 1716, however, Vickers was not referring to Jennings or other Jamaican privateers as part of the Flying Gang. Jennings became an unofficial mayor of the growing pirate colony in Nassau.[citation needed] In 1724, “Capt. Charles Johnson” Johnson-Mist wrote about “Captain Jennings, who was their Commodore, and who always bore a great Sway among them, being a Man of good Understanding, and good Estate, before this Whim took him of going a Pyrating.”Starting in 1716 and for around a year and a half, Jennings sailed during the Golden Age of Piracy, sailing with individuals such as pirate Black Sam Bellamy. When Jennings encountered Bellamy, he teamed with him to commit more piracies against the French.[citation needed] Bellamy double-crossed Jennings, at which point Jennings ruthlessness was evidenced in the brutal slaying of more than 20 Frenchmen and Englishmen, and the burning of an innocent Englishmans merchant sloop.[citation needed] When Hamilton was sailing back to England from Jamaica after being removed from his position in late 1716, Jennings captured Hamilton’s ship. In December 1716, Jennings had his spoils transferred in Kingston.Pardon in 1718 and retirementThe Kings Pardon in 1718 allowed outlaws in the Bahamas to seek relief from British Authorities for a brief period of time, with a general amnesty declared by the newly appointed Governor of the Bahamas, Woodes Rogers.[13] In early 1718, Jennings sailed to Bermuda to turn himself in, surrendering to authorities and accepted the reprieve. He retired as a wealthy plantation owner in Bermuda,[citation needed] and is one of very few pirates said to have enjoyed a successful retirement. It is unknown what his ultimate fate was, though some historians speculate that he was captured by the Spanish in his later years, dying in obscurity in a New Spain prison. Other legends have him growing old with his family in Bermuda.[citation needed]

Summary

Wikipedia Source: Henry Jennings

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